Goal-directed and habitual control in the basal ganglia: implications for Parkinson's disease
Keywords: 
Parkinson Disease/physiopathology
Models, Neurological
Nerve Net/pathology
Neural Pathways/pathology
Issue Date: 
Nov-2010
Publisher: 
Nature Publishing Group
ISSN: 
1471-003X
Citation: 
Redgrave P, Rodriguez M, Smith Y, Rodriguez-Oroz MC, Lehericy S, Bergman H, et al. Goal-directed and habitual control in the basal ganglia: implications for Parkinson's disease. Nat Rev Neurosci. 2010 Nov;11(11):760-72.
Abstract
Progressive loss of the ascending dopaminergic projection in the basal ganglia is a fundamental pathological feature of Parkinson's disease. Studies in animals and humans have identified spatially segregated functional territories in the basal ganglia for the control of goal-directed and habitual actions. In patients with Parkinson's disease the loss of dopamine is predominantly in the posterior putamen, a region of the basal ganglia associated with the control of habitual behaviour. These patients may therefore be forced into a progressive reliance on the goal-directed mode of action control that is mediated by comparatively preserved processing in the rostromedial striatum. Thus, many of their behavioural difficulties may reflect a loss of normal automatic control owing to distorting output signals from habitual control circuits, which impede the expression of goal-directed action.

Files in This Item:
File: 
ukmss-35698.pdf
Description: 
Size: 
1,04 MB
Format: 
Adobe PDF


Items in Dadun are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.