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dc.creatorKull, A. (Anne)-
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-10T11:26:22Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-10T11:26:22Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationKull, A. (2016). Cyborg and Religious? Technonature and Technoculture. Scientia et Fides, 4, nº 1, pp. 295-311es_ES
dc.identifier.issn2353-5636-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10171/42190-
dc.description.abstractWe are all aware that our idea of natural/unnatural has been changing over the centuries. According to Donna Haraway, we must exit the maze of dualisms that has marred the relationships between human and non-human nature for centuries. Cyborg is a figure of speech and asymbol, but preeminently a description of our actual being in contemporary technonature. Her idea has been picked up by artists (e.g. Lynn Randolph, Patricia Piccinini) and philosophers and theologians. The cyborgian organism/human and the world cannot be articulated in terms of black-and-white, us and them, friend and foe, kin and alien, good and evil etc. Our technonatural creatures require our care and love, curiosity and investigation, and there will always be unexpected consequences.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherServicio de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Navarraes_ES
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.subjectPiccininies_ES
dc.subjectTilliches_ES
dc.subjectHarawayes_ES
dc.subjectChallenges to theology and anthropologyes_ES
dc.subjectTechnonaturees_ES
dc.subjectSymboles_ES
dc.subjectCyborges_ES
dc.titleCyborg and Religious? Technonature and Technoculturees_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES

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