Association between sleep disturbances and liver status in obese subjects with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a comparison with healthy controls
Keywords: 
Obesity
NAFLD
Sleep
Sleep duration
Sleep disruption
Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index
Issue Date: 
2019
Publisher: 
MDPI
ISSN: 
2072-6643
Note: 
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons: Atribution License (cc BY)
Citation: 
Marin-Alejandre, B.A. (Bertha Araceli); Abete, I. (Itziar); Cantero-González, I. (Irene); et al. "Association between sleep disturbances and liver status in obese subjects with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a comparison with healthy controls". Nutrients. 11 (2), 2019, 322
Abstract
The relevance of sleep patterns in the onset or evolution of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is still poorly understood. Our aim was to investigate the association between sleep characteristics and hepatic status indicators in obese people with NAFLD compared to normal weight non-NAFLD controls. Ninety-four overweight or obese patients with NAFLD and 40 non-NAFLD normal weight controls assessed by abdominal ultrasonography were enrolled. Hepatic status evaluation considered liver stiffness determined by Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse elastography (ARFI) and transaminases. Additionally, anthropometric measurements, clinical characteristics, and biochemical profiles were determined. Sleep features were evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Hepatic status parameters, anthropometric measurements, and clinical and biochemical markers differed significantly in NAFLD subjects compared to controls, as well as sleep efficiency, sleep disturbance score, and sleep quality score. In the NAFLD group, a higher prevalence of short sleep duration (p = 0.005) and poor sleep quality (p = 0.041) were found. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for NAFLD considering sleep disturbance was 1.59 (1.11–2.28). Regression models that included either sleep disturbance or sleep quality predicted up to 20.3% and 20.4% of the variability of liver stiffness, respectively, and after adjusting for potential confounders.Current findings suggest that sleep disruption may be contributing to the pathogenesis of NAFLD as well as the alteration of the liver may be affecting sleep patterns. Consequently, sleep characteristics may be added to the list of modifiable behaviors to consider in health promotion strategies and in the prevention and management of NAFLD.

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