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dc.creatorHerrero, J.I. (José Ignacio)-
dc.creatorLucena, F. (Felipe)-
dc.creatorQuiroga, J. (Jorge)-
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-10T08:09:29Z-
dc.date.available2022-02-10T08:09:29Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationHerrero, J.I. (José Ignacio); Lucena, F. (Felipe); Quiroga, J. (Jorge). "Randomized study showing the benefit of medical study writing multiple choice questions on their learning". BMC Medical Education. 19 (42), 2019, 2019es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1472-6920-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10171/62904-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Writing multiple choice questions may be a valuable tool for medical education. We asked medical students to generate multiple choice questions and studied its effect on their exams. We hypothesized that students generating questions would improve their learning. Methods: We randomized students in their second and third years at the School of Medicine to write four multiple choice questions on two different sections of General Pathology (Immunopathology and Electrolyte and acid-base status; second year) and Pathophysiology (Blood and Respiratory system; third year). We analyzed whether students writing questions on a section had better results in the exam test in that section than the rest of the students. Results: Seventy-five (38.2%) students wrote questions for General Pathology and 109 (47.6%) for Pathophysiology. Students that wrote questions obtained significantly better results in the exam than those who did not. In General Pathology, students who wrote questions about Immunopathology obtained better results in that section than those who wrote questions about the other section (5.13 versus 3.86 over 10; P = 0.03). In Pathophysiology, the differences between both groups were not significant, but students who wrote good questions about Respiratory system obtained better results in that section than those who wrote good questions about Blood (6.07 versus 4.28 over 10; P = 0.015). Male students wrote good questions in Pathophysiology more frequently than female students (28.1% versus 10.4%; P = 0.02). Conclusions: The writing of multiple choice questions by medical students may improve their learning. A gender effect may also influence this intervention. Future investigations should refine its potential role in teaching.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCes_ES
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.subjectMultiple choice questionses_ES
dc.subjectPathophysiologyes_ES
dc.subjectGeneral pathologyes_ES
dc.subjectExamses_ES
dc.subjectTeaching strategieses_ES
dc.subjectGender differenceses_ES
dc.titleRandomized study showing the benefit of medical study writing multiple choice questions on their learninges_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.description.noteThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12909-019-1469-2-
dadun.citation.number42es_ES
dadun.citation.publicationNameBMC Medical Educationes_ES
dadun.citation.startingPage2019es_ES
dadun.citation.volume19es_ES

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