Do religious factors influence the attitude toward organ donation among medical students? Spanish multicentre study
Keywords: 
Cadaveric organ donation
Transplant
Attitude
Psychosocial
University
Students
Issue Date: 
2019
Publisher: 
Elsevier
ISSN: 
0041-1345
Note: 
This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.
Abstract
Introduction: Religious factors have conditioned the attitude toward organ donation and transplantation (ODT) since the beginning of transplantation, despite the fact that most religions are in favor of transplantation. Objective: To assess the impact of religious beliefs of medical students on their attitude toward ODT. Method: Population under study: Medical students in Spanish universities. Study sample: Stratified by geographical area and academic course. Assessment instrument: Attitude ODT questionnaire PCID-DTO-Ríos, anonymous and self-administered. Results: Of all students, 42% (n = 3907) declare themselves atheists or agnostics. The remaining 58% (n = 5368) declare themselves to be religious, the majority being Catholic (55%, n = 5102). Of the rest, 0.2% are Muslims (n = 8), 0.1% Protestants (n = 1), and the remaining 2.7% (n = 257) indicate other religious doctrines but do not want to specify it. Regarding their attitude toward ODT, those who consider themselves atheists or agnostics have a more favorable attitude than those who consider themselves religious (84% versus 76%; P < .001). Among those who follow some kind of religion, Catholics are more in favor of ODT than non-Catholics (77% vs 64%, P < .001). Note that among the religious, only 57% (n = 3050) know which religion is in favor of transplantation, while 22% (n = 1,152) consider that it has not been pronounced on the matter, 13% (n = 723) think the religion is against donation, and the remaining 8% (n = 443) do not know. Conclusion: The religion professed by medical students conditions their attitude toward donation, with the atheists and agnostics being more in favor of donation.

Files in This Item:
Thumbnail
File
DoReligiousFactors.pdf
Description
Size
417.3 kB
Format
Adobe PDF


Items in Dadun are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.