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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.creatorMoriyon, I. (Ignacio)-
dc.creatorBlasco, J.M. (J. M.)-
dc.creatorLetesson, J.J. (Jean Jacques)-
dc.creatorDe-Massis, F. (Frabizio)-
dc.creatorMoreno, E. (Edgardo)-
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-08T10:49:28Z-
dc.date.available2023-11-08T10:49:28Z-
dc.date.issued2023-
dc.identifier.citationMoriyón-Uría, I. (Ignacio); Blasco, J. M.; Letesson, J. J.; et al. "Brucellosis and one health: inherited and future challenges". Microorganisms. 11 (8), 2023, 2070es
dc.identifier.issn2076-2607-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10171/67829-
dc.description.abstractOne Health is the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines to attain optimal health for people, animals and the environment, a concept that historically owes much to the study of brucellosis, including recent political and ethical considerations. Brucellosis One Health actors include Public Health and Veterinary Services, microbiologists, medical and veterinary practitioners and breeders. Brucellosis awareness, and the correct use of diagnostic, epidemiological and prophylactic tools is essential. In brucellosis, One Health implementation faces inherited and new challenges, some aggravated by global warming and the intensification of breeding to meet growing food demands. In endemic scenarios, disease awareness, stakeholder sensitization/engagement and the need to build breeder trust are unresolved issues, all made difficult by the protean characteristics of this zoonosis. Extended infrastructural weaknesses, often accentuated by geography and climate, are critically important. Capacity-building faces misconceptions derived from an uncritical adoption of control/eradication strategies applied in countries with suitable means, and requires additional reference laboratories in endemic areas. Challenges for One Health implementation include the lack of research in species other than cattle and small ruminants, the need for a safer small ruminant vaccine, the need to fill in the infrastructure gap, the need for realistic capacity-building, the creation of reference laboratories in critical areas, and the stepwise implementation of measures not directly transposed from the so-called developed countries.-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess-
dc.subjectÁrea de Biomedicina-
dc.subjectOne health-
dc.subjectBrucellosis-
dc.subjectAwareness-
dc.subjectCapacity building-
dc.subjectClimate-
dc.subjectGlobal warming-
dc.subjectIntensification-
dc.subjectDiagnosis-
dc.subjectVaccines-
dc.titleBrucellosis and one health: inherited and future challenges-
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/review-
dc.description.noteThis article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/ 4.0/).-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/microorganisms11082070-
dadun.citation.number8-
dadun.citation.publicationNameMICROORGANISMS-
dadun.citation.startingPage2070-
dadun.citation.volume11-
dc.identifier.pmid37630630-

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