An antibiotic potentiator retains its activity after being immobilized on silicone and prevents growth of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms
Keywords: 
Antibiotic resistance
Device-associated infections
Biofilm
Synergy
Polymyxin B nonapeptide.
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Biomaterial
Issue Date: 
2021
Publisher: 
Elsevier
ISSN: 
0928-4931
Note: 
This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license
Citation: 
Shahrour, H. (Hawraa); Dandache, I. (Israa); Martínez-López, A.L. (Ana L.); et al. "An antibiotic potentiator retains its activity after being immobilized on silicone and prevents growth of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms". Materials Science and Engineering: C. (121), 2021, 111876
Abstract
Device-Associated Healthcare-Associated Infections (DA-HAI) are a major threat to public health worldwide since they are associated with increased hospital stays, morbidity, mortality, financial burden, and hospital overload. A strategy to combat DA-HAI involves the use of medical devices endowed with surfaces that can kill or repel pathogens and prevent biofilm formation. We aimed to develop low-toxic protease-resistant anti-biofilm surfaces that can sensitize drug-resistant bacteria to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics. To this end, we hypothesized that polymyxin B nonapeptide (PMBN) could retain its antibiotic-enhancing potential upon immobilization on a biocompatible polymer, such as silicone. The ability of PMBN-coated silicone to sensitize a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (strain Ps4) to antibiotics and block biofilm for- mation was assessed by viable counting, confocal microscopy and safranin uptake. These assays demonstrated that covalently immobilized PMBN enhances not only antibiotics added exogenously but also those incorporated into the functionalized coating. As a result, the functionalized surface exerted a potent bactericidal activity that precluded biofilm formation. PMBN-coated silicone displayed a high level of stability and very low cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity in the presence of antibiotics. We demonstrated for the first time that an antibiotic enhancer can retain its activity when covalently attached to a solid surface. These findings may be applied to the development of medical devices resistant to biofilm formation

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