Minimum Information for Reporting on the Comet Assay (MIRCA): recommendations for describing comet assay procedures and results
Issue Date: 
2020
ISSN: 
1754-2189
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Citation: 
Möller, P. (Peter); Azqueta, A. (Amaya); Boutet-Robinet, E. (Elisa); et al. "Minimum Information for Reporting on the Comet Assay (MIRCA): recommendations for describing comet assay procedures and results". Nature Protocols. 15, 2020, 3817 - 3826
Abstract
The comet assay is a widely used test for the detection of DNA damage and repair activity. However, there are interlaboratory differences in reported levels of baseline and induced damage in the same experimental systems. These differences may be attributed to protocol differences, although it is difficult to identify the relevant conditions because detailed comet assay procedures are not always published. Here, we present a Consensus Statement for the Minimum Information for Reporting Comet Assay (MIRCA) providing recommendations for describing comet assay conditions and results. These recommendations differentiate between ‘desirable’ and ‘essential’ information: ‘essential’ information refers to the precise details that are necessary to assess the quality of the experimental work, whereas ‘desirable’ information relates to technical issues that might be encountered when repeating the experiments. Adherence to MIRCA recommendations should ensure that comet assay results can be easily interpreted and independently verified by other researchers.

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